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Views of London

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View from One Tree Hill in Greenwich Park

View from One Tree Hill in Greenwich Park

I love this picture. You can still stand on the same spot and look over London. The view is different – full of skyscrapers – but you get a feeling of wonder that I like to think the people in this painting felt.

Unknown, Unknown
© National Maritime Museum, London


A view of Greenwich and the Queen's House from the South East.

A view of Greenwich and the Queen's House from the South East.

The couple in the foreground may be Pepys and his wife. It reminds us that people have always come to Greenwich for a good day out.

Hendrick Danckerts., c.1669
© National Maritime Museum, London


View of Deptford from Greenwich

View of Deptford from Greenwich

This painting shows Deptford’s importance as a busy naval dockyard. This history has largely been forgotten.

Unknown, 18th Century
© National Maritime Museum, London


A hay barge off Greenwich

A hay barge off Greenwich

This is a beautiful painting but the hay barge is meeting a practical need. The thousands of horses working in London got through tons of hay each week.

Edward William Cooke, 1835
© National Maritime Museum, London


Manning the Navy

Manning the Navy

During any naval war, press gangs would have been a familiar site in areas where sailors could be found. This painting reminds us that life in eighteenth-century London could be very violent.

S. Collings (artist): J. Barlow (engraver): Bentley & Co (publishers), 1 June 1790
© National Maritime Museum, London


Stumpy Barge 'Early Bird' of London off Greenwich

Stumpy Barge 'Early Bird' of London off Greenwich

Stumpy barges not only have a wonderful name, they remind us that people working on the river had different skills. Stumpy barges were designed to get close into the shore so that goods could be loaded and unloaded. They could also pass under London’s bridges and carry goods far up river.

Unknown, 14 June 1930
© National Maritime Museum, London


The silent highway as it is and as it might be

The silent highway as it is and as it might be

This picture is fascinating because it forms a harmonious composition yet gives two views of the river. We can enjoy the Thames for its beauty, yet also take advantage of it for transport. Arguably, we could make more use of the river today to lighten traffic on the roads.

William Lionel Wyllie (1851-1931), Unknown
© National Maritime Museum, London



National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund