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The Great Western riding a tidal wave, 11 December 1844The Great Western riding a tidal wave, 11 December 1844
The Great Western riding a tidal wave, 11 December 1844

© National Maritime Museum, London

Repro ID: BHC2379
Title: The Great Western riding a tidal wave, 11 December 1844
Description: The 'Great Western' was the first of Brunel's three steamships. A wooden paddle steamer, she was launched at Patterson & Mercer's yard in Bristol on 19 July 1837 and sailed to London later that month to be fitted out. Her two side lever engines and four flue type boilers were constructed and installed by Maudslay Sons & Field of Lambeth. The 'Great Western' sailed from Bristol on her maiden voyage on 8 April 1838, arriving at New York on 23 April. She completed 45 Atlantic voyages to New York for her original owners, the Great Western Steamship Company, before being sold to the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company for its service between Britain and the West Indies. The sale was forced in order to raise funds to salvage the company's other ship, the 'Great Britain' (1843), from Dundrum Bay. Following service to the West Indies, the 'Great Western' was employed as a troop transport during the Crimean War. She was broken up at Castle's Yard on the Thames in August 1856.
Creator: Joseph Walter
Date: c. 1845
Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London


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