Explore this site

Matching game homepage

PortCities London


The correct pairs for this game are shown below.

2003 and 1878

The Trafalgar Tavern was designed by John Kay and opened in 1837 on the site of the Old George Inn. Charles Dickens regularly dined there with his friends Thackeray and Stanfield. In Victorian times, it also became famous for its whitebait dinners, held by the Liberal Party.

2003

National Maritime Museum, Unknown
© National Maritime Museum, London


1878

Jacques-Joseph (James) Tissot, 1878
© National Maritime Museum, London


1930 and 2003

The Angel is the oldest public house in Rotherhithe. It dates back to the 15th century when Bermondsey Monks built the first inn on the site as a resting point for travellers journeying to London. In the 17th century it was the haunt for smugglers and pirates. In the 19th watermen, lightermen and dockers were its main customers. Famous visitors included Judge Jeffries, Samuel Pepys and Captain Cook.

1930

Herbert Williamson, 1930
© Southwark Library Collection


2003

Cleve Severin, 2003
© National Maritime Museum, London


2003 and 1890

The famous riverside tavern 'The Prospect of Whitby', on Wapping Wall, dates back to 1520 and was once a notorious den of smugglers and thieves. It was originally known as the Devil's Tavern. Pepys was a regular visitor and meetings of the Ancient Society of Pepys are still held. In 1777 the pub was renamed after the 'Prospect', a coal ship from Whitby which regularly moored nearby. Dickens was a frequent customer, as were the artists Whistler and Turner. The tavern was accessible directly from the river at low tide.

2003

National Maritime Museum, 2003
© National Maritime Museum, London


1890

Unknown, c. 1890
© National Maritime Museum, London


1930s and 2003

The Grapes, a famous riverside tavern, is described in Charles Dicken's book 'Our Mutual Friend'. In the novel the pub is known as the Six Jolly Fellowship Porters Tavern. It is kept by Miss Abbey Potterson, who according to Dicken's 'reigned supreme on her throne, the bar, and a man must have drunk himself mad drunk indeed if he thought he could contest a point with her...' There are also unsavoury stories connected to the Grapes of watermen taking drunks from the pub to drown them in the river, then sell their corpses for medical dissection.

1930s

Alice West, 1930s
© National Maritime Museum, London


2003

Cleve Severin, 2003
© National Maritime Museum, London



National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund