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To the friends of Negro Emancipation. (Negros rejoicing at their freedom)

To the friends of Negro Emancipation. (Negros rejoicing at their freedom)
To the friends of Negro Emancipation. (Negros rejoicing at their freedom)
© National Maritime Museum, London
Description: Having abolished the slave trade in 1807, popular interest in the issue of slavery declined. However, the revival of anti-slavery agitation, political reform campaigns at home and a massive slave rebellion in Jamaica in 1831 brought the issue to public notice. From 1830 the Anti-slavery Society campaigned for emancipation across all Britain’s colonies. An Abolition of Slavery Bill was eventually passed by parliament in 1833 with abolition set to take place in 1834. £22 million was paid to planters as compensation, although true freedom was not achieved until 1838.
Creator: Rippingille, Alexander [artist]; Lucas, David [engraver]; Moon, Francis Graham [publisher]
Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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