PortCities London
UKBristolHartlepoolLiverpoolLondonSouthampton
You are here:  PortCities London home > People and places
Text Only About this Site Feedback
Explore this site
About maritime London
Early port
Tudor and Stuart port
18th-century port
19th-century port
20th-century port
People and places
Port communities
Crime and punishment
Leisure, health and housing
Thames art, literature and architecture
The working Thames
London's docks and shipping
Trades, industries and institutions
Port of science and discovery
Historical events
Ceremony and catastrophe
London in war and conflict
Fun and games
Things to do
Timeline games
Matching games
Send an e-card
*
   Back to The Contagious Diseases Act
*
**
*

The Young Wanton Privateer bringing a Spanish Prize into the Port of Love.

The Young Wanton Privateer bringing a Spanish Prize into the Port of Love.
The Young Wanton Privateer bringing a Spanish Prize into the Port of Love.
© National Maritime Museum, London
Description: Prostitution was rife in 18th century London. According to one contemporary estimate, almost a sixth of the total population of London’s metropolis were engaged in the vice-trade, often on a part-time basis. Although artists like Thomas Rowlandson and many others depicted prostitution in a humourous and bawdy manner, their work glossed over the reality. For the majority of women, life as a prostitute was nasty, brutish and short. 'The Times' reported in 1785 that each year 5,000 streetwalkers died in the city.
Creator: Unknown
Date: 6 December 1781
Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London
*
*
8
National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
Legal & CopyrightPartner sites:BristolHartlepoolLiverpoolSouthamptonAbout this SiteFeedbackText Only