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A Danish timber barque, by Samuel Scott.A Danish timber barque, by Samuel Scott.
A Danish timber barque, by Samuel Scott.

© National Maritime Museum, London

Repro ID: BHC1040
Title: A Danish timber barque, by Samuel Scott.
Description: In this painting a ship-rigged cat barque is shown on the right, with her anchor raised. She is a Danish trading vessel flying the Danish flag from the stern. Such ships were immensely strong and used to carry large cargoes of timber. She is distinguishable by the lack of a figurehead at a time when even humble craft carried some form of decoration on the bow. The men on the deck appear very small in scale to emphasise the dimensions of the ship. The crew of the small boat are hauling up the barque's anchor with the aid of a davit in the stern as the large ship prepares to get under way. The deck of the barque is crowded with men heaving on halyards and making ropes fast, while high above them half a dozen sailors are perched on the yards loosening the sails. Piles of timber unloaded from the barque are shown on a barge to the left with its identifying number '472' clearly visible. Such details assert the concern of the painting to demonstrate the importance of trade and this is underscored by the inclusion of the other shipping, such as the craft on the right, which is flying the Dutch flag. The action takes place near the mouth of a river and is probably set on the Thames near Gravesend.
Creator: Samuel Scott
Date: 1736
Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London


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