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The Great Dock Strike of 1889

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Introduction


Unloading tea ships in the East India Docks
View full size imageUnloading tea ships in the East India Docks. © NMM
The dangerous nature of port work, combined with low pay, poor working conditions and widespread social deprivation ensured that the workforce looked to their trade unions for protection. As a result, industrial relations were strained throughout the history of the port.

Casual labour 

Dockers presenting themselves for work.
View full size imageDockers presenting themselves for work. © NMM
The first major eruption of unrest came with the Great Dock Strike of 1889. It took place against the background of growing trade unionism among unskilled workers and discontent at the wretched living conditions of dockers and their families. At the root of this was the casual nature of dock labour, organised via the 'call-on' and the contract system.




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Call-on




Casual labour




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