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The 'Princess Alice' tragedy

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Disaster on the Thames


 By the late 19th century, the Thames was increasingly busy. Hundreds of vessels, from large liners to tugs, barges and lighters, used the river each day. Despite ever larger and faster ships, there were no precise 'rules of the road'.

Model of the Princess Alice disaster.
View full size imageA model of the Princess Alice disaster. © NMM

Such confusion inevitably led to tragedy. In 1878, the paddle steamer Princess Alice sank after a needless collision in Galleons Reach.

A ship's wheel spoke from the Princess Alice.
View full size imageA ship's wheel spoke from the Princess Alice. © NMM
More than 600 people lost their lives in what is still the worst ever disaster on a British waterway.

Official enquiries followed the tragedy, and the rules on using the river were finally tightened up.

 

 




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