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What's left of the old port

Introduction
The West India Docks
The East India Docks
Limehouse
Rotherhithe and the Surrey Commercial Docks
The London Docks
Deptford and Greenwich
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Deptford and Greenwich

Deptford was once the home of the Royal Dockyard, the Royal Victualling Yard and many industries dependent on the port and the river. Although there are still some important working wharves, little remains of Deptford's industrial past.

Greenwich, home to the National Maritime Museum and the Cutty Sark, has few remains of the port, but the East Greenwich Pensinsula retains some impressive reminders of the industries that relied on river transport.


The southern entrance to the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.

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The southern entrance to the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.
The cupola at the southern end of the Greenwich Foot Tunnel, which was built between 1899 and 1902 by the London County Council. It was the first free crossing between Greenwich and the Isle of Dogs, and was much used by those who worked in the docks and the industries of the Isle of Dogs.

Inside the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.

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Inside the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.
The Greenwich Foot Tunnel, running between Greenwich and the Isle of Dogs, was built by the London County Council in 1899-1902. The tunnel replaced the unreliable Greenwich Steam Ferry. Inside the tunnel, lined with white tiles, only the lighting has changed since 1902. The tunnel was once used by thousands of workers in the docks and the industries of the Isle of Dogs, and also gave East Enders easy access to Greenwich. Relatively few people use the tunnel today.
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Mumford's Granary on Deptford Creek.

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Mumford's Granary on Deptford Creek.
Mumford's Granary (1897) on Deptford Creek. This is the only surviving part of Mumford's Flour Mills, founded in 1790. The mills received grain directly from small vessels on the Creek.

The Gas Holder, East Greenwich.

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The Gas Holder, East Greenwich.
The huge Gas Holder no 1, built in 1886 as part of the South Metropolitan Gas Company's East Greenwich Gasworks. It was once part of a pair. The second gas holder was even larger, but was demolished after the closure of the Gasworks.
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Introduction
The West India Docks
The East India Docks
Limehouse
Rotherhithe and the Surrey Commercial Docks
The London Docks
Deptford and Greenwich
*
Send this story to a friendSend this story to a friend
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

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Find out more
TrailWest India Docks family trail
Explore the remains of the West India Docks.
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TrailGreenwich foot tunnel trail
Become a port explorer.
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GalleriesLondon's docks: past and present
Contrasting photographs of the docks during the heyday of the working port with images of today's redeveloped Docklands
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Related Resources
Related Images1 Images
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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