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What's left of the old port

Introduction
The West India Docks
The East India Docks
Limehouse
Rotherhithe and the Surrey Commercial Docks
The London Docks
Deptford and Greenwich
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What is left of the old port: The West India Docks

The West India Docks, opened in 1802, were the first of the enclosed docks. They were literally enclosed - being cut off from the surrounding area by a high wall and a moat. Much has survived, despite wartime destruction and the building of the massive Canary Wharf complex on part of the dock site.

Guard House.

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Guard House.
The round Guard House, one of two built in 1802-03. This served as an armoury and lock-up. It was outside the original perimeter moat, but was linked to the dock by a drawbridge.

No 1 Gate.

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No 1 Gate.
The original No 1 Gate. This was the main entrance to the West India Docks and was the scene of the daily 'call-on' - where dock labourers would be taken on for a day's work.
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Constables' cottages.

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Constables' cottages.
These cottages in Garford Street, designed by John Rennie and built in 1819, were for the constables of the West India Dock Company.

Commemorative wall tablet.

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Commemorative wall tablet.
The wall tablet that once graced the original entrance to the docks. It heaps praise on the 'public spirited individuals' who had promoted the docks.
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The Dockmaster's House.

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The Dockmaster's House.
This building served many functions. It has been an excise office, the Jamaica Tavern, and even the Dockmaster's House. It is now a public house.

Replica of original entrance gate.

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Replica of original entrance gate.
A modern replica of the original entrance gate demolished in 1932. On top of the original gate was a sculpture of the 'Hibbert' a vessel engaged in the West India trade, and named after the chairman of the West India Dock Company.
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Warehouses at the Import Dock.

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Warehouses at the Import Dock.
The impressive warehouses on the North Quay of the West India Dock Import Dock. Designed by George Gwyllt, these are the most important surviving early dock warehouses in London.
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Introduction
The West India Docks
The East India Docks
Limehouse
Rotherhithe and the Surrey Commercial Docks
The London Docks
Deptford and Greenwich
*
Send this story to a friendSend this story to a friend
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

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Find out more
TrailWest India Docks family trail
Explore the remains of the West India Docks.
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TrailGreenwich foot tunnel trail
Become a port explorer.
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GalleriesLondon's docks: past and present
Contrasting photographs of the docks during the heyday of the working port with images of today's redeveloped Docklands
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Related Resources
Related Images1 Images
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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