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What's left of the old port

Introduction
The West India Docks
The East India Docks
Limehouse
Rotherhithe and the Surrey Commercial Docks
The London Docks
Deptford and Greenwich
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Limehouse

Formerly home to the Regent's Canal Dock, the Limehouse Cut and several important wharves, Limehouse was one of the first areas to become trendy after the closure of the inner London docks and wharves. Despite this, many interesting features survive.


The Limehouse Basin.

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The Limehouse Basin.
Looking west into the Limehouse Basin, the former Regent's Canal Dock. Once a small dock linking the Regent's Canal with the Thames, this has now become a virtual marina.

The entrance to the Limehouse Basin.

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The entrance to the Limehouse Basin.
The entrance to the Limehouse Basin, the former Regent's Canal Dock. This once linked the Regent's Canal and the main English canal network with the Thames. The lock is still in working order.
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The swing bridge at the Limehouse Basin.

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The swing bridge at the Limehouse Basin.
The outline of the swing bridge across the entrance to the Limehouse Basin. This would open to allow vessels to pass between the Thames and the basin.

The Limekiln Dock.

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The Limekiln Dock.
The Limekiln Dock was once lined with busy wharves, particular Dunbar Wharf, which served Duncan Dunbar's large shipping fleet.
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Former entrance to the Limehouse Cut.

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Former entrance to the Limehouse Cut.
The former entrance to the Limehouse Cut, which linked the Thames with the River Lea Navigation. It has now been blocked up, and survives as a water feature amid new housing. It seems a good breeding site for mallards.

Converted warehouses of Wilson's Wharf.

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Converted warehouses of Wilson's Wharf.
The converted warehouse of J & N Wilson & Co., Ship Stores, in Limehouse. This is one of the many successful conversions in the area.
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Introduction
The West India Docks
The East India Docks
Limehouse
Rotherhithe and the Surrey Commercial Docks
The London Docks
Deptford and Greenwich
*
Send this story to a friendSend this story to a friend
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

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Find out more
TrailWest India Docks family trail
Explore the remains of the West India Docks.
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TrailGreenwich foot tunnel trail
Become a port explorer.
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GalleriesLondon's docks: past and present
Contrasting photographs of the docks during the heyday of the working port with images of today's redeveloped Docklands
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Related Resources
Related Images1 Images
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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