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The Indian summer of the inner London docks: the Grierson Collection

Introduction
Shaw Savill & Albion (I)
Shaw Savill & Albion (II)
The Blue Star Line (I)
The Blue Star Line (II)
PLA tugs
The New Zealand Shipping Company
The Ben Line
The Brocklebank Line
The Harrison Line
The Glen Line
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The Shaw Savill & Albion Line

This line was formed in 1882 out of the merger of Shaw, Savill & Co (founded 1858) and the Glasgow-based Albion Line (founded 1856). It concentrated on the New Zealand route via South Africa, and also ran services to South America and, from 1933, to Australia. It specialised in the carriage of goods, particularly the import of meat and fruit from New Zealand, and also carried many emigrants out to New Zealand.

 


The 'Dominion Monarch'.

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The 'Dominion Monarch'.
The great liner 'Dominion Monarch' (1939, 27,155 GRT) in the King George V Dock in April 1962. She was the largest regular user of the Royal Docks and was one of the world's biggest liners. This photograph was taken right at the end of her career: she was scrapped later that year.

The 'Dominion Monarch'.

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The 'Dominion Monarch'.
Another view of the 'Dominion Monarch' in the King George V Dock in April 1962. She could carry 500 first-class passengers.
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The 'Athenic'.

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The 'Athenic'.
The 'Athenic' (1947, 15,187 GRT) in the Royal Albert Dock in September 1962. Built by Harland and Wolff, she was scrapped in 1969. In the foreground is the 'Chakdara' (1951).

The 'Gothic'.

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The 'Gothic'.
The 'Gothic' (1948, 15,902 GRT) in the Royal Albert Dock in August 1964. She was the sister ship of the 'Corinthic', 'Athenic' and 'Ceramic'. She was sold to Taiwanese breakers in 1969.
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The 'Ceramic'.

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The 'Ceramic'.
The 'Ceramic' (1948, 15,896 GRT) in the Royal Albert Dock in October 1964. Built by Cammell Laird, she was scrapped in 1972.

The 'Wairangi'.

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The 'Wairangi'.
The 'Wairangi' (13,478 GRT) in Galleons Reach in March 1963. She had been built by Harland & Wolff and launched as the 'Empire Grace' in 1943. Shaw, Savill & Albion acquired and renamed her in 1946. Later, in 1963, she ran aground near Stockholm and was refloated and scrapped.
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Introduction
Shaw Savill & Albion (I)
Shaw Savill & Albion (II)
The Blue Star Line (I)
The Blue Star Line (II)
PLA tugs
The New Zealand Shipping Company
The Ben Line
The Brocklebank Line
The Harrison Line
The Glen Line
*
Send this story to a friendSend this story to a friend
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

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Related Resources
Related Galleries12 Galleries
Related Images472 Images
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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