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The Indian summer of the inner London docks: the Grierson Collection

Introduction
Shaw Savill & Albion (I)
Shaw Savill & Albion (II)
The Blue Star Line (I)
The Blue Star Line (II)
PLA tugs
The New Zealand Shipping Company
The Ben Line
The Brocklebank Line
The Harrison Line
The Glen Line
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The Glen Line

This line started from humble beginnings in 1867, when Alan Gow bought a sailing ship to trade between Glasgow, Liverpool and Chile. By 1871, he had he moved into the China tea trade.

From his second vessel onwards, all his ships bore the 'Glen' prefix. The company became MacGregor, Gow and Co in 1880, and specialised in trade with India and the Far East. Their Glenfruin was one of the first vessels to enter the Tilbury Docks in 1886.

The company became the Glen Line in 1910 and passed under control of Elder Dempster in the following year. The Glen Line became part of the Blue Funnel Line in 1935 and traded until 1978.


The 'Glenartney'.

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The 'Glenartney'.
The 'Glenartney' (1940, 9795 GRT) under tow in the King George V Dock in April 1962. Built by the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd, she was scrapped in 1967.

The 'Glengarry'.

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The 'Glengarry'.
The 'Glengarry' (1940, 9311 GRT) had an eventful early life. Built for the Glen Line by the Danish yard Burmeister & Wain's Maskin og Skibsbyggeri A/S, she was seized by the Germans in 1940. She was converted into a minelayer. Recovered in 1945, she was returned to the Glen Line in 1946. She was broken up in 1971. She is shown here in the King George V Dock in June 1962.
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The 'Glenogle'.

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The 'Glenogle'.
The 'Glenogle' (1962, 11,918 GRT) in the King George V Dock in June 1963. She was built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd and was sold to a Hong Kong line in 1978.

The 'Glenfalloch'.

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The 'Glenfalloch'.
One of the Glen Line's last new ships, the 'Glenfalloch' (1963, 11,926 GRT) was built by the Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company. She is seen here in the King George V Dock in May 1964. With the end of the Glen Line in 1978, she was sold to the People's Republic of China.
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The 'Glenorchy'.

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The 'Glenorchy'.
The 'Glenorchy' (1941, 9975 GRT) was built as the 'Priam' for the Blue Funnel Line. She was transferred to the Glen Line in 1948 and scrapped in 1971. Here she is in the King George V Dock in May 1964.

The 'Glenroy'.

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The 'Glenroy'.
The 'Glenroy' (1938, 9809 GRT) in the King George V Dock in August 1965. She was scrapped in the following year.
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The 'Cardiganshire'.

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The 'Cardiganshire'.
The 'Cardiganshire' (1950, 7707 GRT) being manouvered by the tug 'Plagal' (1951) in the King George V Dock in September 1961. Launched as the Blue Funnel Line's 'Bellerophon', she was transferred to the Glen Line in 1957. She reverted to her original name in 1972 and was sold in 1976.

The 'Cardiganshire'.

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The 'Cardiganshire'.
The 'Cardiganshire' (1950, 7707 GRT) under tow by the tug 'Muria' (1946) in the King George V Dock in September 1961. Launched as the Blue Funnel Line's 'Bellerophon', she was transferred to the Glen Line in 1957. She returned to her former name in 1972 and was sold to a Middle Eastern line in 1976.
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The 'Breconshire'.

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The 'Breconshire'.
The Glen Line cargo liner 'Breconshire' (1940, 9061 GRT) in the King George V Dock in October 1962. She had been requisitioned in 1940 and was returned to the Glen Line in 1946. She was scrapped in 1967.

The 'Glengyle'.

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The 'Glengyle'.
The Glen Line's 'Glengyle' (1939, 9919 GRT) in the King George V Dock in March 1962. Built by the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Ltd, she was requisitioned by the Royal Navy and was returned in 1948. She was transferred to the Blue Funnel Line in 1970 and scrapped in the following year.
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The 'Glenearn'.

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The 'Glenearn'.
The 'Glenearn' (1938, 9784 GRT), built by the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company, in the Royal Docks in June 1965. A fine ship, she was requisitioned by the Royal Navy in 1939 and was used as a large infantry landing ship. She was scrapped in 1970.
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Introduction
Shaw Savill & Albion (I)
Shaw Savill & Albion (II)
The Blue Star Line (I)
The Blue Star Line (II)
PLA tugs
The New Zealand Shipping Company
The Ben Line
The Brocklebank Line
The Harrison Line
The Glen Line
*
Send this story to a friendSend this story to a friend
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

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