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Station A - Egypt

The Royal Observatory sent three parties to Egypt in 1874 - one to the Mokattam Hills near Cairo, another to Alexandria and a third to Suez. The Mokattam Hills party included - unusually for the time - two women. These were the wife of Captain C. Orde Browne of the Royal Artillery, who was in charge of the party, and Miss Emily M. Newton, the sister of one of the observers. Both were involved in taking and recording observations of the transit.

Station A - Luxor, Egypt
View full size imageStation A - Luxor, Egypt


The equatorial telescope for Station A.

The equatorial telescope for Station A.

Arriving at Station A1 at Thebes.

Arriving at Station A1 at Thebes.

The equatorial telescope and regulator, destined for Station A, assembled in Greenwich Park.

The 'Dahabeah' arriving at Station A1 at Thebes in Egypt, one of the Station A sites. She carried the astronomers and their instruments.
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Arriving at Station A1 at Thebes.

Arriving at Station A1 at Thebes.

Station A1 at Thebes.

Station A1 at Thebes.

The astronomers arriving at Station A1 at Thebes in Egypt.

The camp at Station A1 at Thebes in Egypt.
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A glass negative of the Transit of Venus.

A glass negative of the Transit of Venus.

A glass negative of the Transit of Venus, taken from Luxor.

A glass negative of the Transit of Venus, taken from Luxor.

Luxor was another site of Station A in Egypt. This glass negative contains one exposure of Venus crossing the Sun’s limb.

A glass negative of the 1874 Transit of Venus, showing one exposure of the planet Venus crossing the Sun’s limb.
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An astronomical regulator clock used at Station A.

An astronomical regulator clock used at Station A.

A portable altazimuth instrument used at Station A.

A portable altazimuth instrument used at Station A.

Twelve new clocks were ordered by the Royal Observatory Greenwich for the Transit of Venus expeditions of 1874. This astronomical regulator clock, Dent No. 2009, is a weight-driven, sidereal, wood pendulum, 8-day regulator with deadbeat escapement with jewelled pallets. For the 1874 expedition it was sent to Cairo in Egypt (Station A). It may also have been used in the 1882 Transit of Venus expeditions. In 1894 it was returned to the Royal Observatory Greenwich and set up in the South East Equatorial dome. It was moved to the Astrographic dome also at Greenwich in 1929 and then to Abinger in 1940 as the controlled clock for the transmission of the time signals.

A portable altazimuth instrument used at Station A (in Egypt) on the Transit of Venus expedition of 1874. An altazimuth instrument is a telescope that moves vertically to measure the altitude (height) of a celestial body and horizontally to find its azimuth, or degrees horizontally from north. This telescope was originally commissioned for the 1874 transit expedition, but was later used at the Royal Observatory and on later expeditions.
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