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Deptford Creek

Deptford Creek is a half-mile, muddy, tidal stretch of the River Ravensbourne flowing into the Thames opposite the Isle of Dogs. It has been a vitally important place in the past, and it is set to be an inspiration for the future.


Deptford Creek from the Thames 2002

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Deptford Creek from the Thames 2002
Deptford Creek is the last, tidal stretch of the River Ravensbourne (Randisbourne) below it flows into a part of the River Thames known as Greenwich Reach. The Creek lies partly in the Borough of Lewisham and partly in the Borough of Greenwich.

Deptford Power Station

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Deptford Power Station
The most famous industrial plant in Deptford Creek was the Power Station. It stood at the mouth of the Creek and supplied electricity to Central London. The river provided an unlimited supply of water for cooling and allowed coal from the North East to be shipped in easily.
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Ship building

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Ship building
From the 16th century until recently, shipbuilding was an important industry on the Creek. Henry VIII's Royal Dockyard and the East India Company's yard at Deptford provided work for small shipbuilders along the Creek.

Milling

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Milling
The tidal Creek has been the site for three corn mills. The power of the tide would drive the machinery to mill the corn, which would be brought into the Creek by barge.
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Other industries

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Other industries
From the early 19th century the Creek also hosted chemical works, engineering works, gasworks, soap and candle factories, sawmills, coal and timber wharves, paint works, breweries, food stores and verdigris works for the manufacture of copper sulphate.

Regeneration

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Regeneration
A new version of the old Ha'penny Hatch footbridge was opened in 2002. The original footbridge gave Greenwich residents access to the London to Greenwich Railway. Other new buildings along the Creek include the Laban Dance Centre, the Creekside Visitor Centre and Floating Education Centre and the Docklands Light Railway.
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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