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Regent's Canal Dock

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The City Basin, Regent's Canal.
© National Maritime Museum, London
Repro ID: PU1417
Description: The Regent's Canal was built to link the Grand Junction Canal's Paddington Arm, which opened in 1801, with the Thames at Limehouse. One of the directors of the canal company was the famous architect John Nash. The Regent's Canal Act was passed in 1812 and the company was formed to build and operate it. Nash's assistant, James Morgan, was appointed as the canal's Engineer. It was opened in two stages, from Paddington to Camden in 1816, and the rest of the canal in 1820. The canal cost £772,000, twice the original estimate. A number of basins were built, including Battlebridge Basin where the London Canal Museum now stands.
Creator: Rudolph Ackermann (publisher)
Date: 1 October 1822
Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London
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National Maritime Museum/Royal Observatory GreenwichNew Opportunities Fund 
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