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Charter party from 8 May 1322 between Walter Giffard, the master of the cog Our Lady of Lyme and Sir Hugh de Berham for a cargo of wine.Charter party from 8 May 1322 between Walter Giffard, the master of the cog Our Lady of Lyme and Sir Hugh de Berham for a cargo of wine.
Charter party between Walter Giffard and Sir Hugh de Berham for a cargo of wine.

© National Maritime Museum, London

Repro ID: H3672-1
Title: Charter party from 8 May 1322 between Walter Giffard, the master of the cog Our Lady of Lyme and Sir Hugh de Berham for a cargo of wine.
Description: In the 14th century Gascony was an important supplier of wine. Although Domesday Book provides some evidence of vineyards in England in the 11th century, native wine production was too limited to supply the country's needs and it appears to have practically faded away. Wine had to be imported. Most of Gascony's wine was exported through Bordeaux, up to 100,000 tons a year by the early 14th century. In the 1950s, Bordeaux was only exporting half that amount in total. In return, cloth, leather and corn were imported from England.
Creator: Unknown
Date: May 1322
Credit line: National Maritime Museum, London


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